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Today's date: 16th May, 2016

Disclaimer

Payment Options & Policy  |  Health Fund Rebates  |  Disclaimer  |  Risks  |  Conditions

Payment Options & Policy

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE STANDARD POLICY IS FULL PAYMENT ON THE DAY OF TREATMENT FOR THE INDIVIDUAL PROCEDURES PERFORMED. IN CERTAIN CASES A DEPOSIT MAY BE REQUIRED PRIOR TO THE COMMENCEMENT OF TREATMENT.

Payment Options
We accept all types of payments:
- Cash
- All Credit and Debit Cards
- EFTPOS
- HICAPS electronic fund-rebate processing
- Cheques

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Health Fund Rebate Information

Australian Dental Association Notification on Health Insurance and Dental Fees (A.D.A Newsletter April 2001)

Dental fees:

  • Unlike Medicare, dental fees are not subsidized by the Federal Government and there is no recognized fee schedule

  • Fees have to be set by the dentist to take account of individual costs of practice, which will vary in different practices

  • As a general rule, a dentist has to pay out approximately 7O% of all fees received in the overhead costs of running a practice

  • If a practice tries to cut these costs to lower the fees you pay, there is a danger that the quality of your treatment may be compromised

  • The fees charged in this practice are kept as low as possible whilst still providing care of the highest quality

  • There is no comfort in providing cheap dentistry if it means a lower quality of care for patients

  • The best way to lower your dental costs is to prevent dental decay and gum disease in the first place. Brushing and flossing your teeth and regular check-ups are a relatively inexpensive way to avoid higher costs
When taking out dental cover, you should be aware that:
  • Each health fund determines what level of rebates it will pay based on its own commercial requirements (no matter what information on Australian dental fees, fund representatives may communicate to a claimant)

  • An important aim of some health funds is, quite appropriately, to make profits for their shareholders as well as to provide rebates for their customers.

  • The rebates payable on dental fees are unlikely, in most cases, to cover more than 60% for common dental items and may cover less than half of the cost of more complex and thus more expensive procedures

  • For some people, these rebates may be of assistance in offsetting some of the costs of the more expensive procedures but some arrangements may not always represent value for money for routine dentistry for you and your family

  • If you have a problem with your private dental insurance, you should contact the fund directly. If you are unable to reach a satisfactory agreement with your fund, contact the Private Health Insurance Ombudsman, an independent body formed to help resolve complaints and provide advice and information. The Ombudsman can be reached on 1800 640 695 or by writing to Suite 1201, Level 12, St Martins Tower, 31 Market St, Sydney NSW 2000. Fax: 02 9261 5937. Email:

The Australian Dental Association Federal office is continuing to receive complaints from dentists concerning patients being informed by health fund staff that the main reason for a low rebate is the particular dentist not adhering to a recommended fee schedule. In fact such a schedule would be against the law and would be regarded as anti competitive conduct. The ADA would appreciate patients notifying them (in writing if possible), if this ever occurs.

Please ask the receptionist for an opinion on choosing a dental fund and plan which is best suited to your needs.

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Disclaimer

  1. The content within this site are for information purposes only and is only indicative. It should not be regarded as dental or medical advice. Such advice can only be provided in a face-to-face consultation following a comprehensive examination and X-rays.

  2. The information contained herewith should not be regarded as comprehensive data. Centre for Aesthetic & Implant Dentistry or its agents, directors, employees or any other related party denies any liability regarding any treatment undertaken in reliance on the information contained in this site.

  3. This Website is dormant and may contain Errors. For updated information please refer to our new website www.smilenet.com.au. We cannot guarantee accuracy, completeness, timeliness or any consequences of the information contained herewith, and offer no warranty of any kind, express or implied, including, but not limited to warranties of performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Responsibility is denied for any errors or omissions. Please forward any errors or complaints to .

  4. This disclaimer is provided without prejudice.

  5. Centre for Aesthetic & Implant Dentistry or its agents, directors, employees or any other related party denies any liability to anyone whatsoever for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information contained in this Site or for any consequential, special or similar damages, even if advised of the possibility of such damage.

  6. This site has links to other websites. Whilst providing the link, this site and Centre for Aesthetic & Implant Dentistry makes no representations as to the accuracy and electronic safety of the links or any information that they may contain

  7. We advise that all dental procedures contain certain risks to the teeth and jaws and can also affect the general health or lifestyle. Furthermore, procedural complications may arise that may vary the course of treatment. >> View disclosure of typical risks

  8. We advise that the procedures described herewith may not be suitable for all patients and the results may vary from patient to patient.

  9. Any references to the impact of cosmetic or implant dentistry on the life or beauty of a patient or their oral function are opinions or extracts of specific patients' (or their partner's) post-operative testimonials. These references should not be considered literally or as being accurate representations or predictions of your own, your partners, or other patients' opinions following similar treatment.

  10. Implant Dentistry and Cosmetic Dentistry are not recognized specialties and any references to an 'Implantologist' or 'Cosmetic Dentist' refers to practitioners who are registered as general dentists with a special interest in Implant or Cosmetic Dentistry. Such terms should be regarded as descriptive of the type of service provided and not to a specialty in the field.

  11. 'Centre for Aesthetic & Implant Dentistry' and 'your smile is essential' are registered trademarks and their use by any unauthorized party is strictly prohibited. Any authority is only valid when provided in writing.

  12. Acknoledgements: some of the contents of this site have been adapted from information from corporate partners such as 'Nobel Biocare' and 'Halas Dental'.

  13. The entire content and references in this website, with the exception of adaptations from other websites as described in clause 12, remain the property of Centre for Aesthetic & Implant Dentistry, including but not limited to all intellectual property rights in the underlying HTML, text, images, logos, and other content material.

  14. We advise that all fees and costs shown herewith are indicative only, may change, and may vary from patient to patient.

  15. Any discounts are non-cumulative and replace any other offers/discounts or are excluded by them.

  16. Health Fund Rebates or Medical Expenditure Tax Rebates are not guaranteed by us and should be confirmed with the relevant fund, tax agent or the Australian Taxation Office.

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Disclosure of Typical Risks

GENERAL SCALE & CLEAN:

This procedure is generally recommended every 6-12 months. The procedure is important to your dental health but may cause sensitivity of the teeth, tooth mobility, and recession of the gums. In some cases referral to a specialist for Periodontal Treatment may be required. Chlorhexidine-containing mouth rinses (eg. Savacol or Plaquacide) may be prescribed. Such rinses DO NOT replace proper oral hygiene practices and may cause discoloration of the teeth and/or tongue. They are only to be used on a temporary basis or as otherwise directed by the dentist.

DENTAL X-RAYS:

X-rays are required to help in establishing a diagnosis, identify pathology or for surgical treatment planning. The radiation risks from dental X-rays are minimal and specific information is available to patients on request. Whilst precautions are taken to minimise a patient's radiation exposure, X-rays are NOT recommended for pregnant women and especially in the first trimester.

DENTAL FILLINGS:

There are numerous different materials that can be used as dental fillings. Whilst we DO NOT use amalgam in this clinic, we do not discourage it's use due to the material's traditional advantages. Patients who prefer the use of amalgam may request to be referred to a suitable practice. In general, two types of direct permanent fillings are being used routinely at this practice: Composites and Glass-Ionomers. Whilst composite fillings are closer in colour to natural teeth and have certain wear advantages over Glass Ionomers, the latter may be better suited in certain circumstances mainly due to their caries arresting properties. Please inform the dentist if you have certain preferences or concerns. Any type of restoration is irreversible and may trigger a reaction of the pulp of the tooth, which may lead to additional procedures, such as 'Root Canal Therapy' at additional costs. The estimated life expectancy is 7-10 years, after which replacement may be required. It is not uncommon, however, for such treatments to last well beyond this time.

CROWNS, BRIDGES & VENEERS:

These procedures involve a material reduction of tooth structure. As such they are irreversible and may trigger a reaction of the pulp of the tooth, which may lead to additional procedures at additional costs. Impeccable oral hygiene practices are required and special care as directed by the dentist, including in some cases wearing a protective Night-Guard, especially in patients who grind their teeth. Gum recession may occur at a gradual and an unpredictable rate and may lead to changes in the appearance of the treated teeth and gums. Future maintenance treatment may include repair, relining, or re-fabrication and may attract an additional cost. The estimated life expectancy is 10-12 years, after which replacement may be required. It is not uncommon, however, for such treatments to last well beyond this.

COSMETIC DENTISTRY:

Utilising the latest in technology and highest quality products may not be enough for achieving the best possible result. Highly aesthetic dentistry requires careful analysis, planning and working closely with a master ceramist who has a great deal of skill and artistic ability. Since it is often difficult to predict the true AESTHETIC COMPLEXITY from an initial dental examination, preliminary and supplementary laboratory procedures may be required. In very complex cases a laboratory supplement may apply. It should be noted that one or more visits to the laboratory may be required.

ROOT CANAL THERAPY:

The procedure typically involves multiple consecutive appointments. It may cause discoloration of the tooth &/or gum. Some other complications of this treatment include incomplete healing, fracture of a file within the canal, or fracture of the root, and may require additional management, referral to a specialist or extraction of the tooth. It is often also necessary to place a crown on the tooth. The fees for such procedures are additional (unless otherwise stated).

IMMEDIATE DENTURES:

Whilst providing patients with the advantage of having their dentures inserted immediately after extraction of their teeth this procedure has certain disadvantages. The 'shrinking' or atrophy of the underlying bone or 'gums' that support the dentures occurs at a rapid rate over the initial 6-12 months following extraction of the teeth. As a result the dentures will become progressively looser and will eventually need re-lining. The re-lining procedure is typically done after 6 months at an additional fee. During the initial 6 months numerous visits may be required for adjustment of the dentures. All subsequent adjustments are complimentary unless a medicated reline or a tissue conditioner is required. In extreme circumstances where bone resorption is excessive or in aesthetically challenging circumstances Re-making of the denture or dentures may be required at an additional fee.

REMOVAL OF WISDOM TEETH:

The procedure may be performed with a local anaesthetic or under a general anaesthetic. It is often a surgical procedure and carries inherent general surgical and anaesthetic risks. The lower wisdom teeth are often in close proximity to nerves that give sensation to the lip, chin, and tongue. Bruising or damage to these nerves may cause loss of sensation to the lip, chin and/or part of the tongue. Such complications are rare and, should they occur, are most likely to be of a temporary nature, but they can also be permanent. The upper wisdom teeth are often in close proximity to the sinuses and other anatomical spaces. Possible complications include the displacement of a tooth into such spaces. Referral to a specialist may be required.

A SEPARATE SIGNED INFORMATION & CONSENT FORM IS ADDITIONALLY REQUIRED.

LIFE EXPECTANCY:

Please note that period noted as life expectancy throughout this form is estimated for permanent & finished prostheses assuming proper oral hygiene practices, regular dental visits, compliance with dental and medical advice, maintenance treatment as required, successful related previous or adjunctive treatments and non-smokers.

DENTAL IMPLANTS:

This procedure typically involves two stages that are approximately 6 months apart. Each stage may require multiple visits. Single stage 'immediate teeth' can be placed in selected cases; however this procedure inherently carries slightly higher risks for possible complications. In all cases impeccable oral hygiene practices are required and special care as directed by the dentist. Although successful and functional dental implants help preserve jaw and facial bones, gum recession and bone loss (atrophy) may still occur at a gradual and an unpredictable rate and may lead to changes in the appearance of the treated teeth, gums, or face. Future maintenance treatment may include tissue-augmentation procedures and attract additional costs. Other possible complications may lead to the removal of one or more implant fixtures and may require placement of additional fixtures and/or re-making of the supported teeth/prostheses at an additional cost. When an implant does not solidly integrate with the bone it is considered to have failed. The risks for failure and other complications are significantly higher in SMOKERS and such patients are strongly encouraged to quit. Continuing to smoke may also affect the warrantee of the implants. It should also be noted that smoking has been linked to oral pathology including aggressive cancer.

The surgical procedure also carries inherent surgical risks, especially when operating in proximity to vital structures. In the upper jaw implants are often placed in close proximity to the sinuses. Possible complications include intrusion into the sinus or perforation of the sinus membrane and may require additional procedures at additional costs. In the lower jaw implants are often placed in proximity to nerves that give sensation to the lip, chin, and tongue. Surgical intrusion or post-operative swelling/haematoma may impinge upon or damage these nerves and may cause altered or loss of sensation to the lip, chin and/or part of the tongue. Such complications are rare due to extensive pre-operative planning and, should they occur, are most likely to be of a temporary nature, but they can also be permanent. The estimated life expectancy of successfully integrated and 24-months function-tested implant fixtures, is in excess of 15 years. The prostheses/teeth that the implants support, however, may have a shorter life expectancy (see below).

A SEPARATE SIGNED INFORMATION & CONSENT FORM IS ADDITIONALLY REQUIRED.


COMPUTER GUIDED DENTAL IMPLANTS 'TEETH IN AN HOUR':

This procedure may not be suitable for all patients. Patients are required to pass selection criteria. In assessing a patient's suitability, additional charges are incurred from a separate radiographic examination (CT Scan).

Not all patients who are suitable for the Computer Guided Dental Implants surgical procedure will also be suitable for immediate teeth to be fitted at the same time as the surgery. Additionally, patients who are planned for immediate teeth cannot be guaranteed that these will, infact, be fitted at the same time as the surgery.

Where the teeth are fitted to the implants at the same time as the surgery, a strict dietary and functional protocol applies. The life expectancy of the first immediate implant-supported prosthesis is sometimes less than similar treatment utilising a 2-stage treatment protocol, and this initial prosthesis is more accurately described as a 'long-term provisional prosthesis'. Where the teeth are not fitted simultaneously, treatment would generally resort to the standard 2-stage protocol as described above and the fitting of the teeth is delayed for 3-6 months.

Typical surgical risks, whilst better measured with this technique, apply nevertheless, and patients are encouraged to read the entire disclosure statement and risks, but in particular the information under the following subheadings of the 'Disclosure of Typical Risks': 'Dental Implants', 'Fixed Implant Supported Prostheses', 'Cosmetic Dentistry', and 'Life expectancy'.

'Teeth In an Hour', 'Nobel Guide' and 'Immediate Teeth' are registered trademarks of Nobel Biocare and have been used in this site with permission from Nobel Biocare Australia. These references should not be considered literally or as being accurate representations or predictions of your own, your partners, or other patients' opinions following similar treatment.

REMOVABLE IMPLANT-SUPPROTED PROSTHESES:

Such prostheses are generally fabricated in acrylic and, in some cases with a Cobalt-Chrome or a Gold-alloy baseplate. Whilst the implants provide significant improvement to the retention and stability of the removable prostheses some sensation of 'movement' during function is normal. Future maintenance treatment may include repair, relining or re-fabrication and may attract additional costs. The estimated life expectancy is 7 years, after which time the acrylic teeth may begin to show signs of increased wear and aesthetic deterioration.

FIXED (NON-REMOVABLE) IMPLANT-SUPPORTED PROSTHESES:

This modality of treatment does not provide for removal of the prostheses by the patient. The 'teeth' are permanently fixed to the implants and can only be removed by a dentist-implantologist. Some prostheses are non-removable altogether. Oral hygiene practices require more skill (dexterity) and diligence. The 'teeth' may be acrylic or porcelain. Porcelain teeth may be individual or bridged and their estimated life expectancy is much greater than acrylic teeth. Future maintenance treatment may include repair, relining or re-fabrication and may attract additional costs. Maintenance or repair of bridged prostheses (porcelain or acrylic) may require the removal of the entire prosthesis whilst individual porcelain teeth allow for individual repairs or remakes without the removal of the entire prosthesis. Estimated life expectancy for acrylic teeth is 7 years, after which time the acrylic teeth may begin to show signs of increased wear and aesthetic deterioration. The estimated life expectancy for porcelain teeth is 12-15 years.

BONE GRAFTING:

This procedure is often performed in conjunction with or in preparation for dental implants. In most cases a mixture of 'Bio-Oss' (bovine bone) with some locally harvested particulate autogenous (your own) bone can be used to improve the volume of bone. Where there is insufficient local bone present the autogenous graft may require surgical harvesting from a distant site in the mouth. This procedure has separate surgical risks and whilst rare, some local numbness may occur. Such procedure may also cause swelling or discomfort at a site distant to where the implants were placed. Bone grafting often delays the timeframe for the second implant stage to 9-12 months. Where extensive grafting or a shorter timeframe is required, an adjunctive process of deriving growth factors from your own blood ('Harvest Technology') can be used to accelerate and promote bone and gingival healing and maturation. This procedure is an additional cost (unless stated otherwise). In extreme circumstances 'Block Grafting' may be required from a different part of the body. Referral to a specialist surgeon may be required, and the timeframe is generally increased to 12-15 months.

GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION (GTR):

GTR is a procedure, often used in conjunction with bone grafting, involving locally isolating bone from the overlying soft tissues /gum by using a special membrane barrier. It works by avoiding soft tissue migration or compression and creating a 'space' into which bone can 'grow'. A number of different types of barrier-membranes are available. In most cases, the membrane is dissolvable. Where a non-dissolvable or titanium-reinforced membrane is used the membrane will require removal about 4-6 months later. Placement of a membrane increases the risks for infection and a strict adherence to the prescribed Oral Hygiene protocols is required.

GENERAL ANAESTHETIC PROCEDURES:

GA procedures are performed either at a registered private Hospital or a Day Surgery Facility. The anaesthetic is administered by a specialist anaesthetist. The fees for the anaesthetist are additional and may be partly claimed through Medicare. The fees for the theatre facilities are also additional and are usually payable on the day of admission. Anaesthetic complications are rare but may include allergic reactions, ischemia (damage resulting from insufficient oxygen to organs), deep vein thrombosis (clotting of the blood), embolism (passage of a blood clot through one's blood to a distant site), paralysis, stroke, or other detriment to one's health. FOOD, DRINKS & ORAL MEDICINES must be avoided at least 6 hours prior to the procedure, or as otherwise directed. Smokers may have delayed recovery or an increased predisposition to complications. Avoidance of smoking and improving the general health with light-moderate exercise (eg. Walking) in the weeks leading up to the procedure helps improve recovery.

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Conditions & Reference to 'Conditions Apply'

All information provided in any form by our staff and representatives, or displayed in our advertisements, including (without limitation) references to procedures, results of treatment, timing of treatment and estimates of costs, is non-specific and always subject to a comprehensive oral examination by a dentist, a diagnostic work-up, radiographic examination, and assessment by a medical practitioner or specialist, as may be required, and at an associated cost and timeframe. Treatment possibilities and results will vary from patient to patient.

The 'Disclaimer' section in its entirety (including all subsections) forms a part of these conditions and should be read entirely before relying on any information provided or making any decision. Any further questions should be directed by e-mail to .

Reference to Finance or Payment Plans

Any finance options or payment plans are subject to a credit check and approval by this clinic and/or other third parties. Responsibility for all outstanding fees remains with the patient or legal guardian at all times.

Reference to 'Computer Guided Dental Implants' and 'All-On-4'

These procedures may not be suitable for all patients. Patients are required to pass selection criteria. In assessing a patient's suitability, additional charges are incurred from a separate radiographic examination (CT Scan).

Typical surgical risks, whilst better measured with this 'computer-guided' approach, apply nevertheless, and patients are encouraged to read the entire disclosure statement and risks, but in particular the information under the following subheadings of the 'Disclosure of Typical Risks': 'Dental Implants', 'Fixed Implant Supported Prostheses', 'Cosmetic Dentistry', and 'Life expectancy'.

'Nobel Guide' is a registered trademark of Nobel Biocare and has been used in this site with permission from Nobel Biocare Australia.

Reference to 'Teeth in an Hour' or 'Immediate Teeth'

Not all patients who are suitable for the Computer Guided Dental Implants surgical procedure or the All-On-4 procedure will also be suitable for immediate teeth to be fitted at the same time as the surgery. Additionally, patients who are planned for immediate teeth cannot be guaranteed that these will, in fact, be fitted at the same time as the surgery.

Where the teeth are fitted to the implants at the same time as the surgery, a strict dietary and functional protocol applies. The life expectancy of the first immediate implant-supported prosthesis is sometimes less than similar treatment utilising a 2-stage treatment protocol, and this initial prosthesis is more accurately described as a 'long-term provisional prosthesis' or the 'healing set'. It is generally recommended to replace the initial prosthesis with long term replacement teeth within 2 years. Where the teeth are not fitted simultaneously, treatment would generally resort to the standard 2-stage protocol where the fitting of the teeth is delayed for 3-6 months.

'Teeth In an Hour', 'Nobel Guide' and 'Beautiful Teeth Now' are registered trademarks of Nobel Biocare and have been used in this site with permission from Nobel Biocare Australia. These and other references stated or implied should not be relied upon, or considered literally as being accurate representations or predictions of your own, your partners, or other patients' treatment possibilities and opinions following any such similar treatment.

Reference to 'Sedation & Sleep Dentistry'

Sedation may not be suitable or available for all patients who request it. Suitability is subject to a health assessment by the visiting specialist anaesthetist who administers the anaesthetic.

There are separate risks associated with the administration of IV Sedation and there is often a limited availability of sessions. As such, there may be some delays in providing the necessary treatment under IV sedation. This may impact on a patient's general or dental health and in this regard other anaesthetic options may be explored. Ensuring our patients safety and comfort is our priority.

Reference to Discounts or Special Offers

Any discounts or special offers are non-cumulative and replace any other discounts or special offers, or are excluded by them.

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